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Dementia

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

A Musical Playlist for a Loved One with Dementia


Do you have a parent or other family member with dementia? And do you often hear them singing or humming the same tune over and over again?

There’s a reason for that.

Your loved one may be losing cognitive functioning – skills like thinking, remembering and reasoning. But studies are showing they remain tied to their love of music. In fact, the research shows that people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias often can reconnect with family, friends and caregivers through music.

One organization that is


Read more . . .


Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Reducing Dementia Risk


A study recently presented in London at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference suggests that lifestyle changes can help prevent dementia, according to a report published by the BBC.

It was also reported at the conference that it is estimated that 47 million people globally suffer with some form of dementia currently and, left untreated, that number can grow to 131 million by 2050.

The scientists who presented the study suggest that these nine preventable factors cause 35 percent of dementia risk, and that with behavioral change, this part of the dementia risk can be significantly reduced or eliminated.

The nine factors and their percentage of the risk are:

  • Mid-life hearing loss – 9%
  • Failing to complete secondary education - 8%
  • Smoking - 5%
  • Failing to seek early treatment for depression - 4%
  • Physical inactivity - 3%
  • Social isolation - 2%
  • High blood pressure - 2%
  • Obesity - 1%
  • Type 2 diabetes - 1%

Unfortunately the remaining 65% of the causes of dementia are what the scientists describe as “non-modifiable.”

So while research continues for a cure for Alzheimer’s and other dementia-related diseases, there is action individuals can take to help with prevention.
Read more . . .


Monday, February 8, 2016

How to Talk to People with Alzheimer's

Maintaining a dialogue with people who have Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia is often challenging. We found a great article in the Philadelphia Inquirer about this and wanted to share it with all of you.

 Expect to say "I'm sorry" a lot if you decide to try one of the trendier ways to communicate with people who have Alzheimer's.

There was a time when caregivers tried orienting people with dementia to reality. That often feels like the natural thing to do.

But at Daylesford Crossing, an assisted-living facility in Paoli, workers are more likely to just go with it if a resident has some strange ideas.

Let's say Mom or Grandma is furiously accusing her neighbor of stealing something. Your first impulse may be to defend the neighbor, but that would just make things worse, said Kathleen Douglass, administrator and dementia specialist at Sage Senior Living, which opened Daylesford five months ago. "I'm sorry that happened to you," is a better answer, she said. Then you can show you've heard the emotion. "You seem really angry. I would be angry too if that happened." It's time to give up thinking your truth and rationality will change the mind of someone with dementia.

Teepa Snow, originator of this positive approach to care, was in Daylesford this month to train about 50 staffers from Sage facilities and some family members in her principles. Snow demonstrated how brain damage from dementia affects behavior and offered hands-on tips to help caregivers fill in the gaps. Snow's goal is to help caregivers make use of what's still working in the brain and compensate for what isn't.

 To read the entire article, go to this link: http://www.philly.com/philly/health/mental-health/20160131_How_to_talk_to_people_with_Alzheimer_s.html

 


Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Medicare Covers Dementia Screening, But be Careful About the Screening?

Medicare covers a variety of medical services for the elderly, but with something as common and severe as dementia, one would think that screening services are detailed and accurate. According to recent research this is not the case at all.

Screening for dementia allows patients to recognize the problem at its early signs and effectively take preventative and treatment actions after diagnosis. In order for this to be the case, screenings must be detailed and should essentially leave the patient with more answers rather than more questions.

For the elderly, risk of dementia increases with age and could lead to conditions such as Alzheimer’s. Unfortunately there is no cure for Alzheimer’s, but there are ways of treating it before it gets out of hand.

Medicare covers dementia screenings, but these screenings consist of about 30 basic questions that can easily be completed in about 10 minutes. According to the U.S Preventative Services Task Force, a group of medical experts, this simple test gives off insufficient results because the test shows indications of latter signs of dementia rather than early signs.

The recommendations for people who want to be tested for early signs of dementia is to undergo the initial screening that is covered by Medicare and then later on have regular follow-up assessments in order to see how the problem is developing.


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